So unfair … Dilbert and engineering

The classic video clip with the lines: “Can he lead a normal life?” “No.  He’ll be an engineer”  We engineers are so misunderstood …

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Ever wondered how they make Lego?

A short video on how Lego is made and tested.

Engineering.com – Games: Sugar Xmas Special

This game is like a custom sugar factory. You have to engineer a sequence that will deliver the materials through the right processes to the right destinations. It starts off easy, but gets challenging quickly.

James Dyson Foundation – challenges you can try

The James Dyson Foundation has some downloadable challenges “for engineers of all ages”.  Download from: http://media.dyson.com/downloads/JDF/drawing/challenges.pdf.

You can also see how people have attempted these challenges by looking at the James Dyson Foundation channel on youtube.

Cambridge Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

The Cambridge Autonomous Underwater Vehicle team are developing an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) for use under the Arctic ice sheets. The vehicle will be able to be deployed and operated by a small team using a standard bore hole to launch the vehicle through the ice and retrieve it again. This will aid research on the underside of ice sheets since most current vehicles require a large area of ice tobe opened up for deployment. The team are also entering the annual Students Autonomous Underwater Challenge – Europe (SAUC-E) competition during the development of the vehicle.

To learn more about the activities of the Cambridge AUV team, please see:  http://www.cambridgeauv.co.uk/

Videos from Cambridge University Spaceflight – the people who brought you ‘Teddy Bears in Space’

University Spaceflight is a student-run society that was founded in 2006 by first year undergraduates Henry Hallam, Robert Fryers and Carl Morland and has grown from strength to strength since then. The team is now around 10 members strong, composed of undergraduates from various disciplines. We believe that just being interested in space as students is not enough, so we are actively joining the new-space generation by designing and launching our own systems. This is not just a brilliant learning experience – it’s also a lot of fun!

To see some amazing pictures and videos of the work of Cambridge University Spaceflight, go to http://www.cusf.co.uk/ or jump to http://vimeo.com/cuspaceflight

Engineers don't just fix things: They make things better. They make the future.

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